Looking for specific midi Feature

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Ustenor
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Looking for specific midi Feature

Unread post by Ustenor »

Hi, I’m Dan

I work in Branson, Mo. in a theater. I am searching for an Arranger Keyboard that will save completed songs using styles to usb as a midi file. I want to take that finished multi track midi file and import it into a daw on the computer to edit and use different sounds. I’m see so much confusing info and I purchased a Roland BK-3, but found out it won’t do this. I’d have to play the song, take the midi out and record multitrack into a daw.

Will the PSR-E463 do this. Since I purchased the Roland, I’m limited on my budget.

Thanks
Dan



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SeaGtGruff
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Re: Looking for specific midi Feature

Unread post by SeaGtGruff »

TL;DR answer: Yes.

The PSR-E463's built-in song recorder will let you record a song with up to 6 tracks, as follows:

Track 1 - Melody track (the Main and Dual parts)
Track 2 - Melody track (the Main and Dual parts)
Track 3 - Melody track (the Main and Dual parts)
Track 4 - Melody track (the Main and Dual parts)
Track 5 - Melody track (the Main and Dual parts)
Track 6 - Accompaniment track (the Style parts)

Each melody track can record the notes you're playing with the Main Voice and, if desired, the Dual Voice-- that is, it can record either a 1-layer sound (the Main Voice by itself) or a 2-layer sound (the Main Voice and Dual Voice).

You can choose different voices for the Main and Dual parts of each track-- for instance, you can set the Main Voice to Acoustic Grand Piano for track 1, set it to Rock Organ for track 2, set it to Bass Guitar for track 3, set it to Trumpet for track 4, and so forth. Thus, the song can consist of 5 different sounds of your choice-- 1 sound per melody track-- although that sound can consist of 2 voices layered together if desired.

You can even choose a drum kit as the Main Voice so you can record your own rhythm track, such as if you want to include a drum solo. Thus, each "melody" track doesn't necessarily need to record a melodic voice, but can be used to record a kit voice if you wish-- that is, a drum kit or sound effects kit where each key plays a different sound rather than all keys playing the same sound at different pitches.

Furthermore, you can switch voices within each melody track if you wish. For example, let's suppose you've used tracks 1 through 4 to record 4 different sounds that play more or less continuously throughout the song, but then you want to record several additional instrument sounds which will be used only during certain measures-- that is, not all at the same time, but rather at different times, such as a flute solo, followed later on by a clarinet solo, or even a sort of back-and-forth section such as a trumpet playing for a measure or two, then a saxophone playing for a measure or two as if in response, then the trumpet plays again, then the saxophone plays again, and so forth. You would do this by setting up Registrations with the different voices you'd like to use on a given track so you can quickly switch to a new voice-- or pair of layered voices-- merely by pressing a Registration button at the desired time.

Thus, even though you can record only 5 melody tracks per song, you can use each melody track to record multiple instrument sounds if you wish, equivalent to 5 musicians playing together, but where any or all of those musicians can put down their current instrument and switch to a different instrument from one part of the song to another.

As for the accompaniment track, it can record whatever Style you've chosen to use, including all section changes and fills, and all chord changes. A Style can consist of up to 8 parts-- Rhythm 1, Rhythm 2, Bass, Chord 1, Chord 2, Pad, Phrase 1, and Phrase 2-- although the PSR-E models group some of those parts together for the purpose of being able to turn them on and off with the Track Control buttons. Thus, for practical purposes we could say that a Style can consist of up to 6 parts-- Drums, Bass, Chord 1, Chord 2, Pad, and Phrases. All of those Style parts will be recorded together on the accompaniment track.

Actually, the accompaniment track doesn't record all of the individual parts of the Style, but merely records which Style you've chosen and which tracks (or parts) of the Style you've toggled on or off, then it records all of the chord and key changes (such as C Major, F Major, G Major, E Minor 7th, and so on), as well as all of the section changes (Intro A, Main A, Fill A-to-B, Main B, Fill B-to-A, Main A, Ending A, and so on). In other words, it records only what it needs to know so it can play back the accompaniment as you had recorded it.

You should be aware that the built-in song recorder does not let you edit individual notes of a track, or record over a portion of a track by "punching in" and "punching out." However, it does let you record over an individual track from beginning to end without having to record over all of the other tracks. Thus, if you play a bad note while recording a track you can either leave it as is or, if you want to correct it then you'll need to record that entire track again.

Once you've finished recording the various tracks of your multi-track User Song, you can use the "Save SMF" option in the File Control menu to convert your User Song to a MIDI song file, which will be written to your USB flash drive. Then you can transfer the USB flash drive to your computer, load the MIDI song file into your DAW, edit and correct it as desired, use your DAW's sounds and virtual instrument plugins, and so on.

Note that, given the simplified nature of the built-in song recorder-- that is, its inability to do punch-ins/punch-outs-- it generally works best as a sort of musical scratchpad for recording your musical ideas as they arise. However, if you can play well enough that you aren't concerned about making mistakes while recording, then you can certainly use it for recording a multi-track song using only the keyboard, without needing to be connected to a computer or tablet and recording in a DAW. But generally speaking-- and this is true no matter what make and model of keyboard you have-- it's usually best to record your tracks directly into a DAW, either using the keyboard as a MIDI controller to play the DAW's sounds and virtual instrument plugins, or recording the keyboard's sounds to an audio track in the DAW, for the simple reason that this gives you greater control and flexibility over the recording and editing process.

But if you need or prefer to make your initial multi-track recordings on the keyboard itself, before transferring them over to a DAW to be edited, revoiced, and so on, you can certainly do that-- and that includes using either a built-in Style or a User Style (that is, an "external" style file which has been loaded and registered to one of the User Style slots). When you save the User Song to your USB flash drive as a "standard MIDI file" or SMF, the accompaniment track will be saved along with the melody tracks so everything can be edited and revoiced in the DAW as desired.

Addendum -- I wasn't very clear about the accompaniment track. It's stored in a sort of simplified format within the User Song, so it doesn't use up any more memory than it needs to. Nevertheless, when you convert the User Song to a standard MIDI file the accompaniment track will be expanded and recorded in all the necessary detail-- that is, all of the individual drum beats, cymbal crashes, bass notes, guitar chords, guitar riffs, and so on which are played by the various Style parts will be written to the standard MIDI file as separate MIDI events on multiple MIDI channels such that the accompaniment can be edited and revoiced within the DAW just like the melody tracks.
Michael Rideout
Current keyboards: Yamaha YPT-400, PSR-E433, PSR-E443, PSR-EW400, MX49 BK
Current controllers: M-Audio Axiom 61-II
Previous keyboards: Farfisa Matador 611; Casio CTK-710

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parametric
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Re: Looking for specific midi Feature

Unread post by parametric »

THAT is a very FULL and detailed description Mike. LOTS of questions answered in the process . . . . . .

THANKS for taking so much trouble (Y)

Chris
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Ustenor
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Re: Looking for specific midi Feature

Unread post by Ustenor »

((i)) Thank you so much, Michael. I appreciate the detailed answer. I’ve spent so much time searching for the answers and I’m glad I came here.

I did go ahead and purchase the PSR-E463. Should be here Thursday. I cannot wait to dive into all the things you described. From the demos on YouTube the sounds are good. I am so picky about sounds. Sometimes too picky I guess. My biggest pet peeve is cymbals. I have so many great sounds on the computer. That’s one of the reasons I was looking to get the midi file into the computer without having to record the whole user song via midi out.

Again, I do appreciate you taking the time to help me.

Dan

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