Piano/Keyboard Chords

Kick back and talk about anything here. Music or non Music related..Anything goes....within reason!

Moderators: Derek, parametric, Saul

User avatar Great Britain
vini
Member
Member
Posts: 21
Joined: Sun Jan 07, 2018 8:33 pm

Piano/Keyboard Chords

Unread post by vini » Sat Feb 23, 2019 3:03 am

Hello friends. I have a question for those of you who might know. Firstly I am not a musician, I just love music. (Although it's never too late?). Anyway my question: What chords would you play a D and E note together? I played A, D & E and it sounded nice. I looked through some piano chord fingering sheets but couldn't find a chord which fitted the bill. I may well of missed it I admit. But someone here will know so.....Thanks in advance for any help. Best regards to you all. vini
User avatar United States of America
SeaGtGruff
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 1002
Joined: Wed Jan 29, 2014 4:24 am

Re: Piano/Keyboard Chords

Unread post by SeaGtGruff » Sat Feb 23, 2019 4:57 am

A sus 4
Michael Rideout
Current keyboards: Yamaha YPT-400, PSR-E433, PSR-E443, PSR-EW400, MX49 BK
Current controllers: M-Audio Axiom 61-II
Previous keyboards: Farfisa Matador 611; Casio CTK-710
User avatar Great Britain
vini
Member
Member
Posts: 21
Joined: Sun Jan 07, 2018 8:33 pm

Re: Piano/Keyboard Chords

Unread post by vini » Sat Feb 23, 2019 8:26 am

I thank you very much sir. That'll be why I couldn't find it. Mine don't do the more complicated chords. Again, thank you. ATB vini
User avatar United States of America
SeaGtGruff
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 1002
Joined: Wed Jan 29, 2014 4:24 am

Re: Piano/Keyboard Chords

Unread post by SeaGtGruff » Sat Feb 23, 2019 9:41 am

I have a four-page PDF file that I cobbled together from some pages on chords taken out of a song book and an owners manual for two of my Yamaha keyboards. It shows the various chords that are recognized by those models, and other brands will have their own sets of chords that they recognize, but I’ll post it here in case it’s useful to you.
yamaha_chords.pdf
(730.59 KiB) Downloaded 64 times
There are also some nice utility programs and apps for your computer or tablet that can show you different musical scales and chords. :)
Michael Rideout
Current keyboards: Yamaha YPT-400, PSR-E433, PSR-E443, PSR-EW400, MX49 BK
Current controllers: M-Audio Axiom 61-II
Previous keyboards: Farfisa Matador 611; Casio CTK-710
User avatar United States of America
SeaGtGruff
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 1002
Joined: Wed Jan 29, 2014 4:24 am

Re: Piano/Keyboard Chords

Unread post by SeaGtGruff » Sat Feb 23, 2019 10:15 am

The chords in that document are shown in the key of C, so it might not be immediately obvious by looking at it that A-D-E is an Asus4 chord.

But if you look at the notes being played and want to know what chord they might correspond to, you can start by looking for any notes that have a 1-to-5 relationship, by which I mean the root of a given key (1) and its perfect fifth (5). That’s because most (but not all) chords include the root and the perfect fifth.

In this case, there are three notes being played, so you can try using each of them as the root and see if one of the other notes is its perfect fifth:

- If A were the root, the perfect fifth would be E, which is one of the other two notes. We have a potential winner! :)
- If D were the root, the perfect fifth would be A, which is one of the other two notes. We have another potential winner! :)
- If E were the root, the perfect fifth would be B, which is not one of the other two notes. That pretty much eliminates E.

Next, you can look at the remaining note to see what its relationship is to the potential root:

- If A were the root and E were the perfect fifth, D would be the perfect fourth.
- If D were the root and A were the perfect fifth, E would be the major second.

Of those two options, the first one offers the best choice, because the perfect fifth and the perfect fourth both have a strong harmonious relationship to the root, whereas the major second has a weaker or lesser relationship to the root.

So the best choice for these three notes would be an A chord of some kind. The two most common A chords would be A Major and A Minor, where the third note is either the major third (C#) or the minor third (C). But in this case the third note is the perfect fourth, which is called a “Suspended Fourth” chord, abbreviated “sus4.” So what you were playing was the Asus4 chord. :)
Michael Rideout
Current keyboards: Yamaha YPT-400, PSR-E433, PSR-E443, PSR-EW400, MX49 BK
Current controllers: M-Audio Axiom 61-II
Previous keyboards: Farfisa Matador 611; Casio CTK-710
User avatar United States of America
SeaGtGruff
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 1002
Joined: Wed Jan 29, 2014 4:24 am

Re: Piano/Keyboard Chords

Unread post by SeaGtGruff » Sat Feb 23, 2019 12:08 pm

Just for completeness, if we were to use each of the three notes as the root, we would get the following three chords:

A-D-E = 1-4-5 = Asus4

D-E-A = 1-2-5 = Dsus2; A-D-E would be the 2nd inversion

E-A-B-D = 1-4-5-7 = E7sus4; A-B-D-E would be the 1st inversion, and A-D-E would be omitting the 5th

You could potentially go with any of those three choices, based on the context in which the chord is being played, such as its position within a series of chords (or chord progression), as well as any other notes being played along with the chord, such as with your other hand or by other instruments.

But I still think that the strongest possible choice, in the absence of any mitigating considerations, is an Asus4 chord. :)
Michael Rideout
Current keyboards: Yamaha YPT-400, PSR-E433, PSR-E443, PSR-EW400, MX49 BK
Current controllers: M-Audio Axiom 61-II
Previous keyboards: Farfisa Matador 611; Casio CTK-710
User avatar Uganda
SysExJohn
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 803
Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2008 1:00 am
Contact:

Re: Piano/Keyboard Chords

Unread post by SysExJohn » Sun Feb 24, 2019 12:58 pm

Nice one, Michael. ((i)) (Y)
UW500; 2xMU1000 + PLGs AN, DX, VL, VH & PF; SC8850; EWI4000s + VL70m; Samson Graphite 49.
Privia PX-560, AN1x, Novation X-Station 25. E-MU 02 cardbus + 1616m x 2. Sonar 7 PE and now CbB. XGworks.
Garritan GPO4 and GPO5, COMB2, JABB3, IO, Organs, Steinway, World, Harps ... and now CFX Concert Grand.
User avatar United States of America
SeaGtGruff
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 1002
Joined: Wed Jan 29, 2014 4:24 am

Re: Piano/Keyboard Chords

Unread post by SeaGtGruff » Sun Feb 24, 2019 11:28 pm

Thank you, John!

I wouldn't call it an E7sus4 chord unless a B were being played as well, but apparently the PSR-E models will recognize it as such even without the B if the notes are in the order E-A-D.

That's another thing that might influence what name we call the chord by-- the order of the notes. Although vini didn't specifically say the notes were in the order A-D-E, that was how I interpreted his first post. If they were in the order D-E-A then the PSR-E models would recognize them as a Dsus2, or what would also be called a D1-2-5 according to the pages from the earlier manual.

The key signature of the piece might also influence the name we call the chord by, especially if the root note is a sharp or a flat.

In the end, I don't know how important the name of the chord really is, other than potentially serving as a sort of guideline for which notes could be played along with the chord (by other parts) and still create the musical harmonies that the composer had intended at that point in the piece. And for an arranger keyboard it could make a difference to the auto accompaniment whether we play these three notes as an Asus4, Dsus2, or E7sus4(minus5).
Michael Rideout
Current keyboards: Yamaha YPT-400, PSR-E433, PSR-E443, PSR-EW400, MX49 BK
Current controllers: M-Audio Axiom 61-II
Previous keyboards: Farfisa Matador 611; Casio CTK-710
User avatar United States of America
anotherscott
Member
Member
Posts: 346
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2013 6:36 pm

Re: Piano/Keyboard Chords

Unread post by anotherscott » Mon Feb 25, 2019 2:23 am

Other chords that include a D and an E:

D9, Dmaj9, E7, Em7
User avatar New Zealand
silverlight
Member
Member
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2018 2:15 pm

Re: Piano/Keyboard Chords

Unread post by silverlight » Sun May 19, 2019 8:01 pm

To spice things up a bit - an ascending bass line progression starting on A and then up to B to C to D and then to E - all these bass notes would work under A,D,E. Naming would be trickier and open to interpretation : Asus4, Bmin7sus, C6add9, Dadd9 and E7sus. You could even continue the bass ascent : Fmaj7add6, Dadd9/F#, Dadd9/G. The same 3 notes would also work over a Bb bass : Bbmaj7#11. So while there may be 3 obvious bass note choices, there are many others that would also sound good and even great in the right context - all depends how the chord relates to the progression it is part of...ie what comes before it and what comes after it. Even a C# in the bass would work in the right situation. The D sounds dissonant but the A and the E are fairly strong chord tones against the C# bass - a chord like this could definitely be used as a passing chord. Same with G# in the bass - it could be used as a passing chord depending on what chord it goes to next. I think the only remaining possible bass note, Eb, would produce the most dissonant chord of the lot and perhaps the only unuseable chord out of all of them...but then you can take a listen to Stravinsky or even some of the progressive rock genre and you'll hear more dissonance than this at times...
User avatar United States of America
shelly0624
Member
Member
Posts: 107
Joined: Sun Jul 14, 2019 4:13 am

Re: Piano/Keyboard Chords

Unread post by shelly0624 » Wed Aug 14, 2019 10:09 pm

Thank you SeaGtGruff, that's helpful ...
Post Reply

Return to “Chill Out Room”