Stand Recommendations

This forum covers the original Montage and the new Montage M series keyboards.

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Davelet Great Britain
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Stand Recommendations

Unread post by Davelet »

I wondered if anyone had any recommendations for a stand for the Montage M8x together with a 2nd tier for a smaller 61-key keyboard (a YC61)?

It's for a home studio so setup / tear-down time aren't an issue. Ideally it'd leave ample space beneath for a 13-note bass pedalboard, expression pedals and a sustain pedal, etc, and its footprint wouldn't significantly extend beyond that of the Montage M8x itself else I'll be endlessly stubbing my toe given where it's going to go. It also needs to sit as far back against a wall as possible.

Many thanks in advance.

David.
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sonic2000gr Greece
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Re: Stand Recommendations

Unread post by sonic2000gr »

I was recently looking at this myself and found quiklok:

https://www.quiklok.com/product/z-726l-keyboard-stand/

(This size should fit M8x according to the specs)
I like the fact the second tier looks very solid and is fully adjustable in terms of width, it is possible to use everything from a small 3 octave synth to a full 5 octave one, and the height of the main stand has no effect on it (unlike the folding variants).

I don't have the stand so no first hand experience. But by the looks and specs (can hold 113 Kg in total) seems very solid.
Yamaha Montage 6 / Yamaha MODX6+ / Yamaha P515WH
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Davelet Great Britain
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Re: Stand Recommendations

Unread post by Davelet »

Many thanks for the suggestion. Actually it's quite similar to my existing Hercules (I think?) Z-stand with the exception that this Quik Lok one has an upper tier that is width-adjustable. The problem with my Hercules stand is that the upper tier is fixed-width and the little rubber feet of the YC61 are in exactly the wrong place for it!

So I think that this would fit the bill - although I think I'd like a little more space beneath for pedalboard and expression pedals / sustain pedal etc. Need to measure up.

Thanks again

David.
ChrisDuncan United States of America
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Re: Stand Recommendations

Unread post by ChrisDuncan »

I have two Z-Stands from Liquid Stands, one in each room. They offer a second tier attachment for them as well but I don't have that.

They're very solid (I believe it's steel construction rather than aluminium), rated for 250 lbs., and I have no wobble when playing the 88 key M8x on one (the other has a Fantom 7, which is lighter). And I bang on the keys like a drunken chimpanzee.

The stand is $80 and the attachment $60, so that looks less expensive than the Quiklok option. That said, while I know how well built the Liquid Stands are, I don't have any experience with Quicklok, so I can't make comparisons.

Here's the product link, and of course you can get them on Amazon.

https://www.liquidstands.com/products/a ... ith-wheels

[edit]
Just noticed you were in London, so I'm not sure about international availability as they're a US company. But if they're available in the UK, Amazon would be the most likely suspect for carrying them.
[/edit]
Davelet Great Britain
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Re: Stand Recommendations

Unread post by Davelet »

Many thanks for the recommendation! A quick check shows that they are available in the UK. I'll have a browse around their website and do some measuring up.

That's two recommendations for Z-stands thus far.

Thanks again.

David.
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Re: Stand Recommendations

Unread post by ChrisDuncan »

They offer them with and without locking wheels, and downstairs in the control room they're on a hardwood floor. Even with just a Fantom 7, which is much lighter than the M8x, it doesn't move unless I deliberately drag it skidding across the floor with some effort.

The wheels, of course, raise the minimum height. My M8x is all the way down, and the white key surface is at 27 1/4 inches (692.15 mm). I think I have the legs as wide as they'll go (although I'm not completely sure about that), and the distance is 30 inches (762 mm). I just have a sustain pedal and another switch pedal.

As for the overall footprint, it's smaller than the width / length of the M8x itself, i.e. if you looked down on the keyboard from the ceiling, you wouldn't see the stand. That said, if you spend a lot of time on the ceiling you should probably seek professional help.
Davelet Great Britain
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Re: Stand Recommendations

Unread post by Davelet »

Thanks for the further info. I measured up and my existing Hercules stand has its legs 34 inches apart and I reckon that's still too small to get a 13-note bass pedalboard, expression pedal, sustain pedal and another footswitch between although I might be wrong. I need to identify the 13-note bass pedalboard I'm going to buy really and only then will I know how big a gap between the legs I need.

I was wondering about those castors, as they're not a good "look" and once it's in place you're never going to need them so good to know that the stands are available without them. My music room is carpeted (which I hate but with all the stuff in there, that carpet's there for life!) and the stand will be going on that and castors are as good as useless on a carpet anyway, IMO.

It's a shame that the upper tier on my existing stand isn't width adjustable to accomodate the feet on my YC61 else I'd just live with that for the time being. I even thought about temporarily unscrewing the feet from it, but I just know that I'll have lost them by the time I come to need them again!

I'll keep chewing on it and see if any further recs come in before taking a plunge.

Thanks again for the help and suggestions.

David.
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Re: Stand Recommendations

Unread post by ChrisDuncan »

They also have this new workstation one, and their second tier works with it, but I think it still may not have enough leg room. They're showing it as 35.5 inches, but that's outside dimensions. The squares are 1 1/2 inches wide so that would take you down to 34, which you said is still too small.

https://www.liquidstands.com/products/p ... orkstation

With two tier stands and something as heavy as the M8x, I think it's going to come down to your comfort level with the wobble factor. I see videos of people putting expensive keyboards on X stands where the wiggle all over the place. I guess that works, but I'd have too much anxiety to concentrate on playing. Plus, I'm not a good enough player to hit a moving target.

Another angle to consider would be a studio desk. They don't make the Argosy Opus anymore, but I have my Kronos on one. The picture gives you an idea of what I'm talking about.

https://vintageking.com/argosy-opus-88- ... orkstation

The problem here, however, is that most studio desks probably aren't designed for multi-tier keyboards, although you might be able to improvise something.

Like most of life, I think it's an exercise in tradeoffs. Stability, foot width, weight capacity, tiers and cosmetics are all factors. You might be able to find something that ticks 100% of the boxes, but if not then it's a matter of what tradeoffs you can live with.
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Re: Stand Recommendations

Unread post by ChrisDuncan »

Davelet wrote: Sun Jul 07, 2024 10:30 pm I need to identify the 13-note bass pedalboard I'm going to buy
Or you could just hire a bass player.

But given some of the bass players I've worked with, again with the tradeoffs...
Davelet Great Britain
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Re: Stand Recommendations

Unread post by Davelet »

Thanks for the further leads.

I think I'll need something like the workstation stand, or a similar "table" stand (so with four legs but without wheels), irrespective of dimensions, just to get rid of the horizontal metal bars right where my shin is which is a problem with the Z-stands I have looked at.

I've had a look around and Yamaha's own stand looks to be one of the better table stands, at quite a price. But not obviously compatible with another vendor's 2nd tier, as the upper tubes have a circular cross-section rather than rectangular, and so you wouldn't be able to clamp anything to them.

I think you're absolutely right about compromises - it seems that no-one makes exactly what it is that I'm after. I don't want to compromise on the bass pedals though - I'm more an organist than a pianist nowadays and my left hand is problematic for reasons unrelated to that. I'd love more than 13 notes but you have to be realistic and, anyway, immediately behind the synth I have a digital (church) organ for proper pedal practice.
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Re: Stand Recommendations

Unread post by ChrisDuncan »

Well, there is one additional solution, taking a note from the broke musician era. Back in the day, we couldn't afford all the pricey stuff we needed, so we went to the local hardware store and built our own.

I am by no means a wood shop or carpenter kinda guy. My friends typically try to keep me as far away from power tools as possible. That said, I've built a number of useful things over the years just by buying steel pipes, fittings and the occasional bit of plywood. When you consider that many of these stands are just aluminum tubing or square steel pipes, it doesn't take a lot of ingenuity to come up with your own design.

The down side of this is that it's often not as pretty as commercial products. The plus side includes reduced price (which was once the driving factor), but more importantly the ability to build exactly what you need rather than having to work around a fixed design.

A musician friend of mine once described hardware stores as magical places full of inspiration. If you visit one with that in mind, you might be surprised at the solutions you come up with.
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